Assimilating verbs (past)

Assimilating verbs are those verbs which have weak consonants (w, y) as their first root consonant. In the past, almost all of these verbs conjugate identically to sound verbs.

Forms II, III, IV, V, IV and X treat their weak letter as a consonant everywhere in the past tense: وصّل waSSal, وافق waafa2, أوصل awSal, توتّر twattar, توافق twaafa2, استوطن stawTan ‘settle’. These forms conjugate in the past exactly like their sound equivalents.

Form VIII, as is often the case, is a bit more complicated, converting the weak letter into a taa2: اتّصل ttaSal ‘get in contact’ (< وصل waSal ‘arrive’). They still conjugate exactly like their sound equivalents, but it’s as though their first root letter was actually ت rather than w or y.

There are no assimilating form IXs.

Form I assimilating verbs

The only kind of assimilating verb that may conjugate differently in the past from their sound equivalent are form Is with the internal vowelling é-e:

وقف wé2ef, wi2ef
‘stand, stop’

ana wé2éft (wi2eft)

وقفت

انا

inte wé2éft (wi2eft)

وقفت

انت

inti wé2éfti (wi2efti)

وقفتي

انتي

huwwe wé2ef (wi2ef)

وقف

هو

hiyye wé2fet (wi2fet)

وقفت

هي

ni7na wé2éfna (wi2efna)

وقفنا

نحنه

intu wé2éftu (wi2eftu)

وقفتو

انتو

hinen wé2fu (wi2fu)

وقفو

هنن

 

As you can see, these verbs conjugate almost identically to sound verbs with the same internal vowelling, except that the first internal vowel doesn’t get dropped when suffixes beginning with consonants are attached, but instead stays in place. Some speakers, however, treat these verbs identically to their sound equivalents and drop the vowel, saying w2éft etc.

The final consonant of the root and the suffixes -t -t are often broken apart with a helping vowel: وصلت Sél@t.