Team Nisreen: ثوغ لايف

 


bonsoir
Good evening.
ahlan
Hi.

بنسوار
أهلا
استاذ ما بتعرف انه الدخان موت بطيء؟
ومين قللك اني مستعجل؟
bonsoir
ahlan
éstaaz maa bta3ref inno éddékhhaan moot baTii2?
w miin 2allek 2énni mista3jel?

Good evening.
Hi.
Sir, don’t you know that smoking is a slow [and painful] death?
(breathes out luxurious cloud of smoke)
And who told you I was in a hurry?

bonsoir – historically Lebanese people, especially the wealthy and educated, regularly spoke French and switched between French and Arabic. Even though French is probably being transplanted by English amongst young people, a lot of French words are still used even by people who don’t speak French at all.

éstaaz – this is the polite, formal way to refer to a man you don’t know. For a woman the equivalent is probably 2aanse for an unmarried woman and maybe maadaam for a married woman. In Syrian and Lebanese it is pronounced not ustaadh but éstaaz.

maa bta3ref énno – I think I’ve mentioned elsewhere that in Syrian and Lebanese, the verb 3éref ‘know’ always has an a instead of an é in its present tense prefixes. énno is presumably from MSA إنّه, but is also the form in front of nouns (where you would just have 2inna in MSA).

dékhhaan – literally ‘smoke’, but used as a colloquial term for cigarettes (baakeet dekhaan ‘packet of smokes’).

2allek – shortened 2aal-lek ‘said to you’. In that video about the camel (seriously, from the amount I reference it I’m starting to wonder if it literally contains all of Arabic grammar) we saw two other Lebanese speakers who have the irregular form 2él-lek here, but many speakers (including, I think, all Palestinians and Jordanians) have the regular form with 2al-.

mista3jel – the participle of sta3jal yista3jel ‘be in a hurry, do X too fast’. Forms with mi-/m- and mu- alternate for participles; mu- is often more formal and appears all the time in certain words (muhandis for example).

Hope I don’t have to explain the joke guys.

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